Tess and Vernon sign big advert deal with M&S despite still hosting shows for BBC, raising eyebrows for potential conflict of interest

Tess and Vernon sign big advert deal with M&S despite still hosting shows for BBC, raising eyebrows for potential conflict of interest

They each earn in the region of £300,000 from their high-profile jobs at the BBC.

But Vernon Kay and Tess Daly risk the wrath of Corporation bosses after signing a lucrative deal to front a Christmas food campaign for Marks & Spencer. The pair have made several clips to share with their Instagram followers to promote the range – despite the BBC’s strict rules about stars profiting from their fame on the network.

Guidelines say they should not seek to capitalise on their stardom while appearing on its programmes. However, the deal began while Ms Daly was hosting Strictly – and she will once again be watched by millions when she presents the Christmas special tomorrow.

It is thought BBC chiefs could take a dim view of the festive theme of the Strictly show clashing with that of the food ads.

Meanwhile, Kay, 48, presents the mid-morning slot on Radio 2 after replacing Ken Bruce earlier this year. A BBC source told The Mail on Sunday: ‘The rules are quite simple – if you are BBC staff you are not supposed to endorse products. You can potentially do it when your show is not on air.

Vernon Kay and Tess Daly have made several clips to share with their Instagram followers to promote the range – despite the BBC's strict rules about stars profiting from their fame on the network

Vernon Kay and Tess Daly have made several clips to share with their Instagram followers to promote the range – despite the BBC’s strict rules about stars profiting from their fame on the network

Guidelines say they should not seek to capitalise on their stardom while appearing on its programmes. However, the deal began while Ms Daly was hosting Strictly – and she will once again be watched by millions when she presents the Christmas special tomorrow

Guidelines say they should not seek to capitalise on their stardom while appearing on its programmes. However, the deal began while Ms Daly was hosting Strictly – and she will once again be watched by millions when she presents the Christmas special tomorrow

‘Between them they earn at least £600,000 from their work at the BBC which is paid for by licence fee payers, it all seems a little bit rotten. How much money do they need?’

In one video, the pair, who married in 2003, are seen food tasting from the range – including spring rolls, chicken flat breads, prawn toast and mini chicken burgers – where they describe themselves as ‘food ambassadors’ for M&S.

Sitting around a table with a huge electric fire in the background and wearing tinsel and a hat from a cracker, Ms Daly, 54, says: ‘No one does party food as well as M&S.’

However, fans were less than impressed. Commenting on the clip, one wrote: ‘More money for people who are already grossly overpaid’, while another said: ‘This is what you call a Christmas bonus.’

Meanwhile, Kay, 48, presents the mid-morning slot on Radio 2 after replacing Ken Bruce earlier this year. A BBC source told The Mail on Sunday: 'The rules are quite simple – if you are BBC staff you are not supposed to endorse products. You can potentially do it when your show is not on air'

Meanwhile, Kay, 48, presents the mid-morning slot on Radio 2 after replacing Ken Bruce earlier this year. A BBC source told The Mail on Sunday: ‘The rules are quite simple – if you are BBC staff you are not supposed to endorse products. You can potentially do it when your show is not on air’

Ms Daly’s BBC salary has not been revealed for some years because Strictly is now made by the Beeb’s commercial arm, BBC Studios, giving bosses a loophole to stop them having to divulge her earnings. 

However, she was paid between £350,000-£399,999 in 2016-2017 for her work by the broadcasting company. Kay’s pay is yet to be revealed as he hasn’t been at the BBC long enough. 

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘Presenters declare all commercial commitments and can continue with those commitments as long as they do not associate the programme or the BBC with their commercial activities.’

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