Millie Mackintosh, 34, opens up about breast cancer scare following lump discovery that sparked overwhelming health anxiety

Bintano
16 Min Read

Millie Mackintosh revealed a shock breast cancer scare in a new Instagram post on Thursday morning.

The former Made in Chelsea star, 34, took to social media to say she’d found a lump on the edge of her left breast recently and went straight to see her GP.

She said that after her ultrasound came back as inconclusive and she had to have a biopsy she ‘spiralled into health anxiety’ while awaiting her results. 

Millie – who shares two children, daughters Sienna, four, and Aurelia, two, with her husband Hugo Taylor – explained that even though she is in good health and had early detection she ‘couldn’t quieten her mind’ that the news would be bad.

Happily when she did get her results it showed that it was a benign lump with no cancerous cells that was most likely caused by hormonal changes – which she said led to ‘the most elation she had ever felt before’. 

Millie Mackintosh, 34, opens up about breast cancer scare following lump discovery that sparked overwhelming health anxiety

Millie Mackintosh revealed a shock breast cancer scare in a new Instagram post on Thursday morning

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The former Made in Chelsea star, 34, took to social media to say she'd found a lump on the edge of her left breast and went straight to see her GP

The former Made in Chelsea star, 34, took to social media to say she’d found a lump on the edge of her left breast and went straight to see her GP

She penned in a lengthy post: ‘PSA: Ladies make sure you to check your breasts!

‘Firstly, I want to say, I’m incredibly fortunate that my experience of finding a lump resulted in a clear diagnosis. For the 55,000 Women & Men diagnosed with Breast Cancer each year, their story & journeys are unbelievably heroic.

‘Last month I discovered a lump on the edge of my left breast. Although I tried to stop my mind from racing, the worry crept in very quickly. I knew this was not something to ignore so I booked in with my GP.

‘Under NHS guidelines, if your symptoms could indicate cancer, your GP will refer you on a two-week urgent referral, so a specialist can see you ASAP.’

She continued: ‘Upon examination with my GP and given my age, I was referred for an Ultrasound rather than a Mammogram. Unfortunately the results were inconclusive and a biopsy was needed. At this point all rational thinking went out the window & I spiraled into my health anxiety. Even the statistics based on my family history (none), physical health (good) age & early detection, couldn’t quieten my mind.

‘I decided whilst waiting for the results I’d try to take a more positive approach. In the day I’d talk to family & close friends (some of which had been through the same) which really helped, but the nights were hard, as I only had my own thoughts and struggled to sleep.

‘Results day finally arrived and the relief of a benign lump with no detection of dangerous cancerous cells, was an elation I had never felt before. It’s believed the lump was likely caused by hormonal changes and didn’t need removing.

‘With 1 in 20 lumps deemed potentially concerning, early detection is one of the most important steps, so please put a few minutes aside for your monthly MOT and don’t put it off!’

The star shares two children, daughters Sienna, four, and Aurelia, two, with her husband Hugo Taylor

The star shares two children, daughters Sienna, four, and Aurelia, two, with her husband Hugo Taylor

She would no doubt have been supported by Huge amid her health anxiety

She would no doubt have been supported by Huge amid her health anxiety

She ended her post by saying: ‘We’re so lucky to be surrounded by those who tirelessly campaign for awareness.

‘There are so many incredible charities, but I felt an instant connection to @coppafeel whose mission is to ensure early accurate detection in young people, by focusing on educating & empowering women to know and fight for their bodies.’

It comes after last week Millie showed off her grey hairs and spots on Instagram on Thursday as she shared her ‘realities’ with fans to combat the sometimes ‘fake’ social media.

The reality star posted several photos for her 1.3 million followers, with captions detailing her daily struggles.

Millie captioned the post: ‘I loved the open and honest conversations on my last life realities post so I’m back with a part two.’

In March, Millie opened up about her body image issues and her feelings of inadequacy as a parent due to her anxiety. 

Today’s caption continued: ‘It’s really important to me to use my platform to share the real, unfiltered sides of life, motherhood, and wellness. If any of my truths resonate with you, drop a comment below!’

She wrote with the introductory image: ‘Social media can be fake sometimes… so here’s some realities I don’t always share.’ 

Two of the realities read: ‘Lately, I’ve been dealing with quite a few breakouts. I’ve been trying to manage them with laser genesis treatments, but it really knocks my confidence when my skin isn’t looking its best.

‘I keep noticing more and more grey hairs, and they’re inching their way closer to the front of my head. I really want to be one of those people who welcomes the changes that come with age, I’m not quite there yet.’

One of the realities read: ‘I’m definitely feeling a bit sentimental as Aurelia grows older. I adore her current age, but the idea of her being my last baby makes me so sad.

‘Carrying her is starting to strain my back, yet I find it hard to say no because what if she stops asking?’ It was accompanied by a photo of Millie and Aurelia cuddling.

For another reality, Millie wrote: ‘Breakfast time with the girls has become a bit of a hurdle lately. They used to love their morning meals, but now it’s like pulling teeth to get them to eat. Funny (sic) enough, they suddenly become hungry right as we’re about to step out the door!’

One photo saw Millie admire some artwork and with it she wrote: ‘Our renovation got pushed back by six weeks, which means it won’t be ready in time for Sienna to start school.

‘It’s been quite stressful, but I’m reframing it and staying positive. I feel so lucky for the opportunity to renovate our home, so even though the wait is longer than expected, I know it’ll be worth it in the end.’ 

A final snap was a selfie of Millie and Hugo. Over it, the reality read: ‘Raising young children can be challenging for any relationship, but I’m happy that we’ve both dedicated ourselves to nurturing and strengthening out bond. The grass is always greener where you water it.’

Comments of support flooded in from Millie’s fans. One read: ‘No 6. broke me – my youngest is turning 5 and I still carry her sometimes and totally know I baby her – she is our last and I know the day is approaching where I can’t carry her like I do.’

Other users wrote: ‘Thanks for sharing – it’s nice to know we are all in it together! ❤️ xxx’; ‘I’m with you and definitely felt all of these…. Motherhood’; ‘Thanks for being so honest millie, i needed that this morning!! You and your beautiful girls are doing amazing x’;

‘Thank you for sharing this! It’s really helpful especially for me to hear about how being parents impacts on your relationship — I think this aspect of parenthood is either just not talked about or only talked about in extremes, when there’s so much nuance to how your relationship with your partner shifts through parenthood! Thanks for being open with this’;

‘I find it so hard to juggle 2 children. I have a 9 year old and a 4 year old, my 4 year old is autistic, non verbal with no danger awareness and I know my 9 year old finds it hard with how much of my time he takes up. I schedule a day each half term for just me and my 9 year old, we go cinema and shopping, something to eat and I find that helps. Xxx’;

‘I love your honesty! I’ve struggled with my skin a lot over the years so it’s so nice to see you posting about this! I’m also getting a few of the silvers. My hair is so dark and I can’t be bothered with the upkeep of coloring it so I’m just going to let the greys keep coming!’

It came after Millie stunned in a straw cowboy hat as she filmed a mystery project in a West London park the Sunday before with her daughters Sienna and Aurelia.

The reality star looked beautiful in a boho lightweight white maxi dress pairing it with a pale pink uniquely patterned waistcoat. 

Millie bought ice creams for herself, her daughters, and her staff as they took a break from filming the unannounced project. 

MailOnline contacted Millie’s reps for more information. 

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

It comes from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding tissue it is called ‘invasive’. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in those over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men, though this is rare.

Staging indicates how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast-growing. High-grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under a microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest X-ray.

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How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focused on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops them from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying.
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 means more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancernow.org or call its free helpline on 0808 800 6000

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